Abstracts numero 10

Poetry, Publishing and Economy, and Other Stormy Associations

by Franco Nasi | This is the introduction to the monographic issue of «tradurre» devoted to poetry translated into Italian. It briefly considers a few specific aspects of poetic translation and of its position within the publishing world. It then proceeds to outline the three sections of the issue. The first section illustrates the presence of translated poetry in 20th century Italian publishing; the second is an overview of what…

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American Poetry in Italy before and after 1985

by Massimo Bacigalupo | American poetry has enjoyed a huge readership in Italy. Major figures like Whitman, Dickinson and the chief Modernists and Beats have been translated many times, with the possible exception of Robert Frost. In the postwar years, until about 1975, several major anthologies were published and the canonical translations of Whitman, Dickinson, Masters, Pound, Eliot, Ginsberg, Plath, Williams, Moore, Cummings, Lowell, Corso and Ferlinghetti appeared. Beat poetry

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Brodskij & Co. The Translation of Russian Poetry in Italy from 1980s to 2010s

by Giulia Baselica | When the Nobel prize for literature was assigned to the Soviet Russian poet Iosif Brodskij, in 1987, it marked a change in the perception of Russian poetry in Italian culture. New translations of 19th and 20th century classical poets came out, some already known to the public (Puškin,

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“Making Out a Path”. Nordic Poetry in Translation

by Bruno Berni | The direct and widespread translation of Scandinavian literature in Italy is relatively recent: it has only been a common practice since the last decades of the 20th century. The translation of Nordic poetry, therefore,

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Butterfly Valley: Translating Inger Christensen

by Bruno Berni | Translating Inger Christensen (1935-2009) is a special experience because of the structure of her works, which are always based on one or more – often extralinguistic – systems that make

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O Muse, Get Away. Notes on the Passage to Italy of German-language Poetry

by Massimo Bonifazio | The reception of German-language poetry in Italy must be considered from various points of view, taking into account both the authors (“classics” or “emerging writers”) and the mediators (“scholars” or “publishers”). A lot has been translated in the past fifty years and there have been some important editions, philologically speaking, especially as regards the “classics”. The “emerging writers” are

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Diverse Verses: is Arabic Poetry Untranslatable or the Victim of Persistent Exclusion?

by Francesca Maria Corrao | Translating Arabic poetry is crucial in order to have an overall view of the cultural scene of Mediterranean societies. For the Arabs, poetry represents the highest means of expression and its beauty has always been a source of pride. Metaphors can convey hope and despair

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Passigli Editori, Florence. Poetry’s New Life

by Fabrizio Dall’Aglio | When a reader reads a text for the first time and that text is a translation, for him/her that translation plays the role of the original. Every literary translation pursues an aesthetic goal which is partly independent from the original text, and this is all the more true in the case of poetry, the translation of which needs to take into account not only the semantic…

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French Poetry in Italian (1990-2016)

by Fabio Scotto | This article is an overview of French poetry translated into Italian since 1990. The author provides a historical introduction, outlining similarities and differences between the poetic literatures of the two countries, especially as regards the use of prose in poetry, which is more prevalent in France than in Italy. In the third and final part of the article, the author makes some personal considerations on his…

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On Translating Poetry, Once Again

by Joëlle Gardes | This article analyses the main difficulties encountered in translating Tommaso Di Dio’s collection Tua e di tutti into French, La tienne et à tous. It adopts the point of view of the translator faced with an allusive kind of poetry, full of references to the poet’s private memories and

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